Tag Archives: Mali

Songhoy Blues – Nick : Mali Song of the Week

This week’s Song of the Week is a tale of two Nicks, inspired by the Songhoy Blues song. The band used the music video to showcase their fun and frolics from Glastonbury Festival last year. Getting a fantastic billing on the Pyramid Stage produced probably their most significant performance to date. The video – directed excellently by Connor Gilhooly with stunning videography – summarises a perfect Glastonbury experience. The long slog down some forgotten A-road, the sun, the drizzle, the standing-around-in-a-patch-of-muddy-gravelly-stuff. Charmingly, it encapsulates the bands personality entirely too. The unchanging fun, the sense of awe, the adventure; as if the world is the entertainer, not the other way around.

The video, somewhat ingeniously, captures one of the most important constants in the imagery of desert blues – travel. Or rather, to put it less romantically, transit. The latter preferred here as it alludes to that often cited monotonous, mesmerising, sometimes soporific, feature of getting from one place to the other as well as some of the more torpid examples of Malian blues. The song title here refers to Yeah Yeah Yeahs guitarist Nick Zinner – the man behind the zest of Songhoy Blues’ break-through track ‘Soubour‘. Now many readers out there will know of another Nick, one whose legend puts him a close second behind Saint Nicolas in the list of ‘All Time Greatest Nicks’. For the last three decades or so primarily through his work with the World Circuit record label Nick Gold has been at the forefront of world music production, specialising in Cuban and West African music. Ali Farka Toure, Toumani Diabaté, Buena Vista Social Club, Oumou Sangaré all arrived in our eardrums in such exquisite form courtesy of Gold. Indeed you are still far more likely to hear a Malian song about him than any other Nick, with Ali Farka Toure and Toumani Diabaté having already made notable tributes.

That is not to say that this new Nick on the block is less worthy of praise, only newer, and different. After all, Songhoy Blues did write a song about him. As a musician first and foremost he can go toe-to-toe with Songhoy Blues and understand different things. Though relatively new to Mali music scene, Zinner is well travelled and has played with a whole host of different musicians. In an insightful interview Zinner comes across as characteristically relaxed. Like the band, he seems impregnable; unfazed by the hype that surrounds Africa Express and Songhoy Blues, explaining things as how they are and in so doing makes them so much more real. So much more astonishing.

Getting ever better, Songhoy Blues stand on the cusp of another career defining performance. Without Glastonbury’s ‘passing trade’ they have taken on full responsibility of filling the 2000-capacity Roundhouse in north London this Saturday (21st). They however do have some help from some friends in the form of the incredible Fatoumata Diawara, Blick Bassy, United Vibrations and a DJ set from Dave Okumu (The Invisible). Tickets are still on sale, allegedly, so before you act on the presumption that the only way into this gig would be smuggled within a calabash, perhaps check here first: http://www.roundhouse.org.uk/whats-on/2016/songhoy-blues/. See you there.

 

Songhoy Blues – Nick

 

Sam Garbett is Public Affairs Coordinator for the Mali Development Group – www.malidg.org.uk.

To get in touch with Sam for further information he’d be happy to hear from you at sam.garbett@malidg.org.uk. Any comments and ideas for improving the Hub are especially welcome. We all look forward to hearing from you. Thanks for tuning in.

The Mali Interest Hub is an initiative run by the Mali Development Group, supported by the Alliance for Mali.

Cheb Mami, Passi, Youssou N’Dour, Papa Wemba, Femi Kuti & Rokia Traore – Mali 2002 : Mali Song of the Week

There are moments in history where football and music have sat perfectly together. An inseparable double-act able of catapulting human emotions to places not thought possible. Music is sometimes the only means by which we can comprehend those moments, and the best aid we have to relive them. Thanks to the BBC’s coverage of France 98 rarely can a hint of Garbiel Faure’s ‘Pavane’ go by without daydreams of a plucky Michael Owen or the majesty of Zinedine Zidane. In the last week, a splendid recreation of one of these special moments was orchestrated by Leicester City’s Italian manager Claudio Renieri. The Foxes’ magical Premier League triumph has been made all the more glorious when Andrea Bocelli stepped out to put on a ‘spine-tingling‘ rendition of Nessun Dorma at the King Power Stadium on Sunday, making the official presentation of their title achievement all the more globally and historically resonant. The song is so strongly associated with the sensational Luciano Pavarotti and the romance of Italia 90 it provided the perfect catalyst for further dreaming about a reawakening of football, a collective nostalgia groping for a sign of those ‘better days’ resigned to ones childhood, now lost in the commercial mist of modern football. The dreams of glory had been steadily ground away. Abandoned after so many humiliations. At best they were merely delusions, surely? Thought forever lost to a grotesque contemporary agenda of merchandising, agent fees, and headlines about TV rights, that fledgling optimism has been plucked out like a dusty cassette full of treasured songs.

The 23rd African Cup of Nations of 2002 was held in Mali. In a continent besotted by football West Africa is its powerhouse, contributing the vast majority of winners and participants of previous tournaments. Cameroon, Africa’s most successful international team, won the tournament of 2002, with a good Malian side finishing 4th in its first tournament since 1994. After 2002, Mali’s national side picked up another 4th place finish and later back-to-back bronze medals in 2012-13. With a pair of joint top scorers in the last decade also, it represents an good era of Malian football. But, the natural order was restored, as it all came crashing down in the cruellest of ways in the tournament of 2015. Mali was drawn into a group of death. Cameroon, Guinea and Ivory Coast would battle with Les Aigles in Equatorial Guinea for two precious tickets to the knock-out stages. The end of a tense and frankly ridiculous week in Group D saw five of the six games end as 1 – 1 draws, with Cameroon unexpectedly slumping to the bottom of the group following a 1 – 0 defeat to Ivory Coast, sending Les Éléphants through top. So suddenly it was down to Guinea and Mali for the 2nd and final spot. Level on points, equal on their ‘head-to-head’ records, the same goals scored and same goals conceded. At every turn the teams were statistically inseparable, but someone had to go home. It boiled down to a drawing of lots, with Guinea progressing on nothing more than luck. Imagine the pandemonium if England were booted out of a World Cup after losing a coin-toss to Germany…

Of course, every international tournament needs a song, and the cobbled together unofficial, impulsive tunes always turn out to be much more entertaining than any of the official dross that usually rolled out. So here comes “Mali 2002” a fine specimen of multi-nation, multi-genred thumping, feel-good, comfortably-tacky AfroPop. A beautiful collaborative mess of six artists from a selection of the 2002 tournament’s competing countries. Attributed through YouTube to Algerian singer-songwriter Cheb Mami, the song also has vocals from Mali’s Rokia Traore, Nigerian Afrobeat hero Femi Kuti, Senegalese all-rounder Youssou N’Dour (also a successful actor, businessman and politician) and a set of Congolese: the hip-hop artist Passi and the late, great Papa Wemba, who sadly passed away in April this year. The song summarises all that is great about these peaceful,coming-togethers of different peoples – the vibrancy, the interaction of cultures of ideas, the crazy fun; all facilitated by the passions and marvels of football.

Rokia Traore was the only woman in this pan-African line up. As Mali’s national team enters a period of transition it can look to its youth for those future dreams, that allusive yet recycling optimism. For the first time it appears it can also look to its women. Earlier this month it was announced that Mali would soon be getting its first national women’s football league comprised of a respectable 12 teams. With the popularity, and subsequent wealth, of women’s football growing steadily world-wide, Mali’s women see this as an opportunity to build successful careers and – perhaps one day – proudly carry the hopes of a nation into the prestige and glamour of an international tournament.

And as Mali steps into this new uncharted world, once again the perpetual wisdom of Nessun Dorma will help us transform this into an age of optimism if we but listen. The song, famous for its steady, soaring procession to the most thundering of climaxes summarises the spirit of Leicester City’s story and that of any perennial underdog; it forces us to defy what has come before and dream:

 

Dilegua, o notte!
Tramontate, stelle!
Tramontate, stelle!
All’alba vincerò!
Vincerò! Vincerò!

Vanish, o night!
Fade, you stars!
Fade, you stars!
At dawn, I will win!
I will win! I will win!

 

 

Cheb Mami, Passi, Youssou N’Dour, Papa Wemba, Femi Kuti & Rokia Traore – Mali 2002

 

Sam Garbett is Public Affairs Coordinator for the Mali Development Group – www.malidg.org.uk.

To get in touch with Sam for further information he’d be happy to hear from you at sam.garbett@malidg.org.uk. Any comments and ideas for improving the Hub are especially welcome. We all look forward to hearing from you. Thanks for tuning in.

The Mali Interest Hub is an initiative run by the Mali Development Group, supported by the Alliance for Mali.

Amadou & Mariam – Se Te Djon Ye : Mali Song of the Week

 ‘Se Te Djon Ye’ starts like a long lost Metallica song. A silky guitar running free, in a distinctive steady and folksy manner. Then that voice appears – not Metallica then. Or at least not just Metallica. Not entirely prepared to abandon my instinct, I consider that this is perhaps a new classic; a collaboration between a previously unknown African artist and the US heavy metal legends? Nope. Its Amadou & Mariam from start to finish. If I was ever surprised I should be equally ashamed.

Like the previous Amadou & Mariam song to make it onto the Hub – ‘Dougou Badia’ – this is may be another “chuffing great masterstroke of genre-less genre mixing“. But  ‘Se Te Djon Ye’ is not genre-less (whatever that means). It is in fact a hint of where Amadou & Mariam began their on their journey to international acclaim. Having first released ‘Se Te Djon Ye’ in 1996 (some 17 years before ‘Dougou Badia’) its is an example of the couple’s very earliest commercial work; coming from a group of songs created and released on audio cassette solely for a domestic and African audience. The lead up to and “international break-through” success with the album Sou Ni Tilé in 1999 encouraged them to rediscover some of their earlier work. ‘Se Te Djon Ye’ became the title track on an album with a whole range of intriguing clues to the duo’s earliest influences and harks to a period of their artistry which was not created with a global audience immediately in mind.

Perhaps the influence of Metallica and other American and European rock bands did come in to play in these early days. But the 1990s was an age of learning for the Western world too. A well-told story is the one of the ‘discovery’ of Ali Farka Toure in 1993/94. More accurately: his arrival on the world music scene forced a realisation in the US that blues wasn’t entirely their invention, only a style borrowed and redeveloped. And so once again here, Amadou & Mariam’s piece points to the complex world of flowing and interconnected musical expansion which is so evident and enjoyed in the music of this west African country.

 

 

Amadou & Mariam – Se Te Djon Ye 

 

Sam Garbett is Public Affairs Coordinator for the Mali Development Group – www.malidg.org.uk.

To get in touch with Sam for further information he’d be happy to hear from you at sam.garbett@malidg.org.uk. Any comments and ideas for improving the Hub are especially welcome. We all look forward to hearing from you. Thanks for tuning in.

The Mali Interest Hub is an initiative run by the Mali Development Group, supported by the Alliance for Mali.

Ali Farka Toure – Tulumba : Mali Song of the Week

Ali Farka Toure songs are never short of emotion. ‘Tulumba’ announces itself triumphantly which somewhat betrays the rest of the song. It continues in at the pace of a melancholic shanty, not despairing but grieving.

And there is much to grieve over in the last week of Malian life. On April 14th the great and widely celebrated Malian photographer Malick Sidibé passed away in Bamako aged 80. In a delightful tribute, Ofeibea Quist-Arcton, International Correspondent with NPR, described the effect Sidibé’s death has had on the country through the words of Mali’s culture minister, N’Diaye Ramatoulaye Diallo. He was undoubtedly a “national treasure” whose loss the entire country is mourning.

The war in the north of Mali has seen a bloody week. Civilians, soldiers and humanitarians all falling victim to the enduring instability, growing distrust and angst at a wretched situation of which no one appears to have the strength to control. In that void violence thrives. The International Committee of the Red Cross announced on Monday that for a month three of its aid workers on assignment in deep in the north in Abeibara had been missing. Only a week before this announcement, three French soldiers had been killed in a landmine blast during a routine drive from Gao with President Hollande expressing “deep sadness” upon hearing the news. And perhaps most troubling of all is the situation in Kidal. Reports from Mali on April 19th describe how a street protest formed to demonstrate against arrests made by French and UN forces which they allege were arbitrary and undermined peace efforts. The situation turned violent resulting in 4 deaths, 7 injuries – 2 seriously – a trashed airport, and shots fired, reportedly by UN soldiers as much as anyone else.

In these desperate times we must consider the wisdom of Toure and Sidibé – these two late, great Malians – and not slip so easily into sorrow and defeat. Artists leave us with gifts, new tools to understand and interpret the world. In 2008, Sidibé told The Daily Telegraph “For me, photography is all about youth…It’s about a happy world full of joy, not some kid crying on a street corner or a sick person.” Writing about the motivation to create the album Niafunké (named after his beloved home town) from which ‘Tulumba’ hails, Ali Farka Toure explained that:

“My music is about where I come from and our way of life and it is full of important messages for Africans. In the West perhaps this music is just entertainment and I don’t expect people to understand. But I hope some might take the time to listen and learn.”

So whilst we can rejoice in the magic that these artists produce, we must also consider their approach and look deeper. We must allow ourselves to be challenged by what is being presented to us. This may appear difficult without access to context or language and perhaps as a Westerner it can never be fully understood. But this spectacular photography and music is unquestionably stirring. It makes an impression on us. Let’s gather that feeling up and at the very least we can try and understand it, unpick it, respond to it and see what we learn from there. Perhaps there is a way through.

 

 

Ali Farka Toure – Tulumba

 

Sam Garbett is Public Affairs Coordinator for the Mali Development Group – www.malidg.org.uk.

To get in touch with Sam for further information he’d be happy to hear from you at sam.garbett@malidg.org.uk. Any comments and ideas for improving the Hub are especially welcome. We all look forward to hearing from you. Thanks for tuning in.

The Mali Interest Hub is an initiative run by the Mali Development Group, supported by the Alliance for Mali.

Rokia Traoré – Tu Voles : Mali Song of the Week

“Tu Voles”/”You fly” sings Rokia in this glorious opener to her 2016 album Né So. Where the album title itself means ‘home‘ this week’s Song means the opposite. “Home” is intended as “an invitation to think about the idea of ‘home'” and the privilege that comes with having one, whereas “Tu Voles” is about striving and escapism.

You fly, from every hurt, you release yourself, and you swim through the air, you fly…

Delving deeper; are the songs in fact on a similar theme? In both Traore encourages us to consider the plight of those that have no home and sings to us and imposes a character on us of a person so ill at ease, frightened, intimidated, troubled they resort to metaphor; they achieve that universal, impossible dream of humankind through force of will alone. This in a way is Traore’s trademark – using the beauty and vulnerability of “her raspy, quavering voice” to encourage empathy. Mark Hudson of The Telegraph notes that this must be a reflection of “the gravity” of her recent experience – and that of her homeland – noting that the album “is subdued, moody, even dark at times.” He continues;

“Since her last album, 2013’s buoyant and optimistic Beautiful Africa, she’s seen her homeland torn apart by a brutal civil war, including the recent Islamist atrocity in the capital Bamako, and has been beset by a more general sense of “things falling apart”.”

In her own way, Traoré has taken flight herself, with her artistry safely stowed in the overhead compartment. She like so many of Mali’s musicians has become a self-appointed ambassador for her country constantly flying worldwide to tell the rest of us what Mali is all about. To encourage the celebration of its beauty and understanding of its struggles. After taking up a very prestigious place on the Cannes Film Festival Main Jury last year, Traoré will be taking to the greatest stage of all this summer after being confirmed in the Glastonbury line-up – the festival continuing its marvellous support of Mali’s musicians. Malian’s have also been confirmed at a range of other festivals for example, Songhoy Blues have just completed a Tour in Australia and New Zealand, taking in those respective countries’s WOMAD festival. Back in the UK, WOMAD has yet to grace the shores of this soggy island in 2016, the festival scheduled for 28th-31st July. There French fiddle will meet Malian kora, percussion and vocals in the form of the exciting collaborative new-comers N’Diale.

So with the importance of her message evident here’s to hoping that Rokia is rewarded with one of the weekend’s precious “sunset slots” where the magic of the festival is unveiled in its entirety; liquid gold streaming around the summit of Glastonbury Tor, streaming down its sides, an image that defines the majesty of the place. Tens of thousands in a sun-soak crowd, basking in the immediacy of that fading moment before the giver of all life creeps away to brighten up a new day elsewhere on Earth.

Well, it’s that or it’ll be lashing it down with rain.

 

 

Rokia Traoré – Tu Voles

 

Sam Garbett is Public Affairs Coordinator for the Mali Development Group – www.malidg.org.uk.

To get in touch with Sam for further information he’d be happy to hear from you at sam.garbett@malidg.org.uk. Any comments and ideas for improving the Hub are especially welcome. We all look forward to hearing from you. Thanks for tuning in.

The Mali Interest Hub is an initiative run by the Mali Development Group, supported by the Alliance for Mali.

Issa Bagayogo – Saye Mogo Bana : Mali Song of the Week

Previously, Issa Bagayogo has been applauded primarily for his wizardry in the use of electronic instruments – drum machines, samplers – to create a distinctive and exceptional “groove” by combining them with the more conventional sounds of Mali. This week’s Song has been plucked out to try and emphasise another string to his bow. ‘Saye Mogo Bana’ is the opening track on a very good afro-electro-hip-hop compilation album called African GrooveWhat dear Issa Bagayogo is not often credited with is his amazing voice. Sometimes overshadowed by technical aptitude and compelling compositions, Bagayogo should also be recognised for contributing the “soulful vocals” as well as the “bluesy ngoni” to his music, as pointed to in the album’s pull-out. His voice is smooth and easy on the ear, and sits neatly on top of the chilled rhythms he has orchestrated below.

 

Issa Bagayogo – Saye Mogo Bana

 

Sam Garbett is Public Affairs Coordinator for the Mali Development Group – www.malidg.org.uk.

To get in touch with Sam for further information he’d be happy to hear from you at sam.garbett@malidg.org.uk. Any comments and ideas for improving the Hub are especially welcome. We all look forward to hearing from you. Thanks for tuning in.

The Mali Interest Hub is an initiative run by the Mali Development Group, supported by the Alliance for Mali.

AfroCubism – Benséma : Mali Song of the Week

Whatever the political and economic consequences of President Obama’s trip to Cuba this week, we’ve learnt a bit about him and the country he visited. We can also see that a whole lot hasn’t changed. Another thing that has evidentially remained unchanged – during that 20th Century “constant” of the Cold War conflict between the US and Cuba – is that the Caribbean nation remains enamoured, at every turn, with music. Scenes from a Major League Baseball exhibition game between the Cuban national team and the Tampa Bay Rays held yesterday morning show jubilation in the crowds whenever the band started up – which appeared to be every other minute. Rapturous and genuine applause even bloomed at the final notes of the Star Spangled Banner. Ahead of the game President Obama penned a short article explaining the significance and purpose of the match:

“That’s what this visit is about: remembering what we share, reflecting upon the barriers we’ve broken.”

This is of course must be framed as a uniquely American reflection on Cuba. Other countries, particular those in Africa, have not endorsed the isolationist policies of the US and remember different struggles. On the contrary Cuba has a rich history of cooperation in Africa where they attacked barriers from the same side. Nelson Mandela famously thanked Castro and the Cuban people for the “selfless” support received for the anti-apartheid movement. In many ways its was the “critical” intervention in the gradual and successful defeat of apartheid. Apartheid itself means  “the state of being apart” when translated from Afrikaans. To be anti-apartheid is to show a willingness to come together. In this case it was for the advancement of the rights and liberties of people from the other side of the world.

It is a difficult truth for the US to digest, no less for Noble Peace Prize winner Obama. In an incredible exchange that just about everybody should watch, Mandela during his visit to the US in 1990 was challenged by Ken Adelman from the Institute of Contemporary Studies for his praise of the human rights advocacy of Gaddafi, Arafat and Castro. In his response, Mandela alludes to the comparatively lack of support the US government ever showed the ANC, which barely extended beyond rhetoric, in its fight for human rights in South Africa. With his ‘normalising’ speeches and actions in Cuba over the last few days Obama is trying to work his magic on a particularly prickly legacy of his predecessors; that all too often American diplomacy has failed to bring the world together. Utilising sport to correct this is not a new Cold War trick and indeed its going to take a whole lot of ballgames to convince some commentators that the US’s actions against Cuba ought to be laid to rest.

Sport and culture facilitates all sorts of diplomatic relations, though not always positive I hasten to add. This is no different in Mali. Its relations with South Africa for example have been nurtured through two recent projects: 1) the crucial assistance Mali received from South Africa when its ability to host the African Cup of Nations in 2002 looked in doubt and 2) the on-going South African-led Timbuktu manuscript restoration and preservation project. With Cuba, Mali shares its music. Historically, Mali had some Cold War ties with Cuba, but over the last century its music has bound its people together more closely – even if many of them may not have known it.

Sadly, in researching this article I couldn’t find direct evidence of Malian and Cuban official relations being nurtured though musical connections, though I’m sure I would eventually. In a visit to the country last year, it is reported that (the source is from the Cuban Communist Party) President of the National Assembly of Mali, Issaka Sidibé, “thanked Cuban authorities for their cooperation with his country in various spheres, including health, sport and education”. Advancing cultural exchange was high on the agenda also. The musical harmony between the two countries is captured in this week’s Song of The Week. It hints at that unquantifiable, allusive and often dismissed quality, the very existence of it and its transformative powers Obama is banking will take hold in Cuba. Like sport music has a common language. A set of rules recognised nearly everywhere. Toumani Diabate – who features in this week’s SOTW – explained how during the AfroCubism project the various musicians from Mali, Cuba and elsewhere:

“…cannot even speak together on stage…music has created its own language. It’s the music message, and I think the message is true to the audiences [and] to the world also at the same time.”

It provides hope that separated peoples – by the Straights of Florida or the Atlantic Ocean, by education or simply by the passage of time – can find common intrinsically human pursuits to strip away the polluting effects of titles, labels, ignorance and othering. In its place there is always a chance for peace, happiness and cooperation. But just a chance.

 

AfroCubism – Benséma

 

Sam Garbett is Public Affairs Coordinator for the Mali Development Group – www.malidg.org.uk.

To get in touch with Sam for further information he’d be happy to hear from you at sam.garbett@malidg.org.uk. Any comments and ideas for improving the Hub are especially welcome. We all look forward to hearing from you. Thanks for tuning in.

The Mali Interest Hub is an initiative run by the Mali Development Group, supported by the Alliance for Mali.

Vieux Farka Toure & Julia Easterlin – Little Things : Mali Song of the Week

This week Vieux Farka Toure links up with American singer-songwriter Julia Easterlin. A new one for me too, but she’s taking the US by storm already as the “one-woman acapella group” and the “one-woman chorus“. This new, industrious, loop-machining young woman met Farka Toure in New York in 2014. Vieux Farka Toure has quite a knack for these spontaneous meetings – the story of this album’s creation sounding quite similar to that magical one with Idan Rachel, the Israeli pianist. As with Rachel, it wasn’t long before the pair knew they had something exciting brewing;  “within about one or two hours we had created four songs together” he explains.

It is astonishing how easily it appears that such delights can come together. Again, Six Degrees Records comes up with some fantastic stories of how another of their releases came to be:

“Julia Easterlin’s melody and lyrics are new, but they are built upon a classic West African song, “Kaira.” Both Vieux and his late father, the legendary blues guitarist Ali Farka Touré, have recorded “Kaira” before; this time, Vieux explains, “I played it in a bit of a new way on guitar, in my own style, and Julia began to improvise on top.””

Toure must have something special about him to enable him to mold and meld his way into all sorts of different musical environments. It must be another manifestation of the theory that historic west African music forms part of the base for contemporary music around the world. The album Touristes from which this week’s song hails from is certainly a music person’ s album. There are all sorts of musical homages, easily exposed influences and plenty of creative “re-imaginings” – as Easterlin would describe them – even before you get to the three ‘startling‘ covers. ‘Little Things’ is a quasi-original; a rework of a West African classic into a modern, yet naturally pleasing, song.

Vieux Farka Toure & Julia Easterlin – Little Things

Sam Garbett is Public Affairs Coordinator for the Mali Development Group – www.malidg.org.uk.

To get in touch with Sam for further information he’d be happy to hear from you at sam.garbett@malidg.org.uk. Any comments and ideas for improving the Hub are especially welcome. We all look forward to hearing from you. Thanks for tuning in.

The Mali Interest Hub is an initiative run by the Mali Development Group, supported by the Alliance for Mali.

Ballaké Sissoko & Vincent Segal – Passa Quatro

This song comes from the very long awaited second album from cello-kora duo Sissoko and Segal; Musique de Nuit. It does not disappoint as it more than matches the precision and delicacy of their first album Chamber MusicIf you’re in Bristol and are pondering what to do tonight then you could to worse that pop along to St Georges Church Concert Hall to see these two sensational musicians live. A suitably elegant venue for each achingly beautiful chord.

I will save my words for another time – a comprehensive review, forensic in detail, of the whole album has already been published on the Six Degrees Records website and is certainly worth a read. It is fascinating to read of the influences and elements captured in Musique de Nuit and it is pleasing to see Sissoko and Segal avoid the ‘2nd album syndrome’ trap by choosing not to make a futile attempt to recapture the magic of the 1st. Its clear that they are moving things forward.

Whilst you listen, I would recommend watching the gentle, simple video to this song. Take the time out of your day to enjoy the float down stream.

Ballaké Sissoko & Vincent Segal – Passa Quatro

Sam Garbett is Public Affairs Coordinator for the Mali Development Group – www.malidg.org.uk.

To get in touch with Sam for further information he’d be happy to hear from you at sam.garbett@malidg.org.uk. Any comments and ideas for improving the Hub are especially welcome. We all look forward to hearing from you. Thanks for tuning in.

The Mali Interest Hub is an initiative run by the Mali Development Group, supported by the Alliance for Mali.

Mylmo – Dakan Tigui : Mali Song of the Week

Confronting defeat can sometimes be a more rewarding process than celebrating victory. Earlier this month a superb African Nations Cup (not to be confused with the African Cup of Nations) came to a painful close for Mali – the Eagles slumped to a 3 – 0 defeat against the DR Congo in the Amahoro Stadium in Kigali, Rwanda. An electric evening for their opponents saw Mali fail to register; stunned by an outrageous opening goal from 19 year old Meshack Elia. This strike inspired a victory celebrated far and wide; even by the DRC’s UN Stabilization Mission MONUSCO. No similar commentary from is Malian sister mission MINUSMA – dubbed the most dangerous peacekeeping mission on Earth – which from its Twitter feed looked to be slightly preoccupied with an armed assault on one of its bases at the time.

The unique brilliance of the African Nations Cup is that only players playing for a club in their country of origin are allowed to participate. The tournament thus rouses a different sense of pride amongst its followers. Rather than celebrating the excellence of those who break into the European leagues – their nation’s ambassadors reunited under their flag – it was instead the time to celebrate the younger, blossoming talents still delighting fans up and down the Sahel. In a situation that was described as “do or die” for these young footballers, their comprehensive defeat could have been a crushing moment in their promising careers and yet another blow to the country’s spirit.

Quite the opposite. The defeated Eagles were welcomed home “as heroes” with crowds, music, and speeches filling the Stade Modibo Keïta in Bamako. It was quite clear that Mali had decided to enjoy itself. Yes, they did not win, but by defying the instinct to succumb to disappointment Malian’s proved to each other that they were capable of more. Anyone can celebrate victory – it takes true pride, dedication and willingness to celebrate defeat. Summarising the mood Malian Football Federation Vice-President Kassoum Coulibaly said:

“You’ve stumbled on the day of the final, but you have not fallen with the flag.You have today written a glorious page of the Malian football. Tomorrow again I’m sure you’ll do more than you did in Kigali.” [translated from French using Google]

The optimism for the future is striking and cannot be an emotion many Malian politicians or public servants has had too much practice in over recent years. It aligns itself with the report last week which detailed how at the Festival Acoustik de Bamako it was Mali’s youth that stole the show and frenzied the crowd.  In front of the welcoming crowds in the Stadium Modibo Keita, the presence of rap artists like Mylmo provoked a growing optimism in Mali’s young people. There is a much darker side to this – with anecdotal stories from Malian musicians performing here in the UK all confirming a frightening trend of drugs and violence becoming an all-too-common past-time for a generation its country failed when it crumbled into war (the terrifying yet excellent Christian Aid & The Joliba Trust report into The Power of Drug Money is a must read in this regard). But rap musicians have offered an alternative voice. As Andy Morgan writes in a gripping and eye-opening article:

“When the country’s government collapsed…it was Mali’s hip hop scene that was the loudest and most relevant voice. At a moment when music’s political value seems like a thing of the past, hip hop in Mali is at the center of a discussion about democracy, globalisation and tradition.”

Indeed it isn’t just the future that Mali’s young people and musical pioneers are illuminating. It is also finding a way to connect a generation with their traditions and locality. Legendary kora player Ballaké Sissoko explains:

“Rap is pretty new as a scene in Mali. I think it’s a good thing in a way. It inspires the youth to make music, which they do in their language. It might sound American in its production but it’s still very local.”

This week’s Song of the Week has been plucked out to showcase that traditional-modern awareness and celebrate the work of Malian rappers. Its not the traditional sounds we are perhaps more used to hearing here, but its the music that is encouraging, inspiring and leading a generation to consider a future that isn’t condemned to defeat.

 

Mylmo – Dakan Tigui

 

Sam Garbett is Public Affairs Coordinator for the Mali Development Group – www.malidg.org.uk.

To get in touch with Sam for further information he’d be happy to hear from you at sam.garbett@malidg.org.uk. Any comments and ideas for improving the Hub are especially welcome. We all look forward to hearing from you. Thanks for tuning in.

The Mali Interest Hub is an initiative run by the Mali Development Group, supported by the Alliance for Mali.