Tag Archives: SOTW

Djelimady Tounkara – Mandé Djeliou : Mali Song of the Week

How to submit a post

Over the past week many of you have been in touch to ask how to get a post up on the Hub. The response to the new Hub has been fantastic – all your suggestions have been greatly appreciated and will all be up soon. In response, there is now a permenent Forum post with the process of getting materials  up on the site, which I repeat here:

Please send all ideas, reports, articles and hyperlinks to sam.garbett@malidg.org.uk.

Every post on the MIH is catergorised under the following headers by subject. Therefore, when submiting a post for publication it would be useful for you to consider how the post may be categorised:

Current Affairs

Conflict
Development
Environment
News
Politics

Music & Culture

Art
‘Meeting Mali’ (for snapshots of Malian life)
Music
Sport

Action & Appeals

Appeals
Events (UK or Mali)
Petitions
Volunteering

Reports & Resources

History
Organisational News
Reports

It’s easy enough to open up a new category if required so do write in with your suggestions for that too.

We also aim to feature an image on every post, where possible. The correct credit and source of any photos must be published (name, agency and hyperlink). This must be included.

Otherwise, that’s about it. Join in!

Speaking of categories, Tounkara’s album which this week’s song comes from “Sigui” won the Africa category at the BBC 3 Awards for World Music in 2002, beating fellow Malian nominees Habib Kioté and Rokia Traore in the process. When featured for the first time on the Hub I was “boggled that Tounkara’s acoustic-guitar spectacular hadn’t been a SOTW already”. It seems that arriving later that expected is a Toukaran trait. Jon Lusk also expressed huge surprise when writing in 2001 he reported that:

“…incredibly, it wasn’t until this year that his first solo album was released. Sigui showcases his remarkable finger picking skills in the context of an acoustic ensemble. Tounkara reinterprets old traditional griot tunes and a number of classic songs from the Rail Band years with the help of nine talented singers and instrumentalists. His intricate runs of notes are accompanied by percussion, bass, guitar and the scrabbling notes of the ‘ngoni’, considered by many to be West African precursor of the banjo.”

And, famously and sadly, Tounkara’s participation in a collaboration with the best of Cuban music was also delayed, the guitarist missing out on the Buena Vista Social Club project on diplomatic technicalities. Even so, it hardly matters in the long run. As Lusk explains:

“Fans of Djelimady’s inimitable guitar technique have been waiting a long time for this record and few are disappointed with it.”

Djemilady Tounkara – Mandé Djeliou

 

Sam Garbett is Public Affairs Coordinator for the Mali Development Group – www.malidg.org.uk.

To get in touch with Sam for further information he’d be happy to hear from you at sam.garbett@malidg.org.uk. Any comments and ideas for improving the Hub are especially welcome. We all look forward to hearing from you. Thanks for tuning in.

The Mali Interest Hub is an initiative run by the Mali Development Group, supported by the Alliance for Mali.

Amadou and Mariam – Welcome to Mali : Mali Song of the Week

Welcome indeed! To what I feel is a new and improved Mali Interest Hub. I hope you will agree. Along with the obvious change in appearance, there has been some fundamental changes to the site’s functionality that will now cater for a whole range of different content and enable the ready exchange of news and ideas amongst readers. The two main changes are the site’s new indexing system – allowing readers to filter articles, resources, appeals, media and much more by different categories – and the introduction of the Mali Interest Forum – where users can generate and comment on threads about any topic of their choice.

Through all these chops, changes and additions the purpose of the Hub remains the same: “to raise awareness not only about the vibrant country that is Mali, but also the wide ranging issues that affect it.” A crucial part of achieving this goal has been to help bring together all who have an interest of any kind in the well-being and future of Mali and its people. Previously, we have focused on music and culture – starting with the celebration of the boldest and brightest facets of Malian life. And while the Song of the Week isn’t going anywhere, this new Mali Interest Hub will only thrive in the way it should with a steady stream of content. With this, we need your help. It will become what we make of it. Has the NGO you work for or support published a new report? Have you seen a petition circulating online? Will you be travelling to Mali and need some advice? Are you already there and need a lift? Is there an event in Parliament or is Vieux Farka Toure playing your home town? The Hub has a great new potential to connect all who love Mali in a new and exciting way, and therefore we would simply love to hear from you. Tell us what’s going on.

Over the course of the next few weeks you will see a whole load of new and hopefully interesting content make its way onto the site. If during this period you begin receiving hundreds of email notifications please let me know and please accept my apologies – there are still a few tiny issues to iron out. But on the whole, I’m pretty chuffed with the results so far – and the fun has only just begun.

Thanks for sticking with us. Here’s to the future. “I ni ce!”

Amadou & Mariam – Welcome to Mali 

 

Sam Garbett is Public Affairs Coordinator for the Mali Development Group – www.malidg.org.uk.

To get in touch with Sam for further information he’d be happy to hear from you at sam.garbett@malidg.org.uk. Any comments and ideas for improving the Hub are especially welcome. We all look forward to hearing from you. Thanks for tuning in.

The Mali Interest Hub is an initiative run by the Mali Development Group, supported by the Alliance for Mali.

Toumani Diabaté & Sidiki Diabaté – Lampedusa : Mali Song of the Week

Gently does it. What’s the rush? Come on, treat yourself to the grand-master of the serene and his son in this sensational duet. The double-kora combines like a pair of butterflies dancing in the breeze, the feather-like strums light enough to float on air. The song blooms and busies itself with the intricate, cascading melodies the kora – especially when under the thumbs of a Diabaté – are known for. But all the while, the song remains sturdy. It eases up periodically, flowing into a chorus of sorts. Achingly so. Where the silences between the notes create the effect. In fact it is these sudden, tiny, absences, the cold gaps in the sunlight, that define the song. You urge it on; hoping to return to the pleasant melodies.

Instead it peters out, returning home. To nothing.

Toumani Diabaté & Sidiki Diabaté – Lampedusa

Sam Garbett is Public Affairs Coordinator for the Mali Development Group – www.malidg.org.uk.

To get in touch with Sam for further information he’d be happy to hear from you at sam.garbett@malidg.org.uk. Any comments and ideas for improving the Hub are especially welcome. We all look forward to hearing from you. Thanks for tuning in.

The Mali Interest Hub is an initiative run by the Mali Development Group, supported by the Alliance for Mali.

Tinariwen – Lulla : Mali Song of the Week

Lulla? Like Lullaby?

Apparently not, but there’s a thought. The soothing and mesmerising genetics of Mali’s music does lend itself to the ancient subliminal art of convincing children to go to sleep. But with one search through Google and just when it was looking like an original, fantastic, idea it emerged that The Rough Guides series had already done it, and marvellously so. The Rough Guide to African Lullabies “features a whole host of sweet tempered songs from different corners of Africa. The music gently rocks listeners away in to blissful deep dreams” – whether they are therefore genuine, traditional lullabies is unclear. Doubt it. Ladysmith Black Mambazo, Miriam Mekeba and Ethiopian pianist, composer and nun Emahoy Tsegué-Maryam Guèbrou line up alongside a impressive squad of West Africans and others from across the continent. Angelique Kidjo and Ba Cissoko join Ali Farka Touré, Toumani Diabaté and Bassekou Kouyaté in just another example of how this region of the planet has a special thing going on when it comes to music.

Tinariwen are not really notable by their absence in this compilation album; their explosive guitars and vocals hardly the right mood-setter for afternoon nap time. But who knows what sends a baby of the desert to sleep? After hours of whirling winds and the hive-like drone of the sand dunes themselves perhaps something with a bit more rhythm does just the trick.

Devastating is the news contained in a recent UN study which identifies 250,000 Malian children who will not grow up with either their mother, father, or both; orphaned as a result of the conflict and poverty gripping their country. Aid workers struggling to meet demand at camps near the Mauritania border say they simply do not have enough resources to feed, cloth and shelter these most vulnerable of displaced people. Without an urgent change in fortunes, many of these thousands of children will have nothing but the cold, empty hum of the desert sand to comfort them into an unsettled sleep.

 

Tinariwen – Lulla

 

Sam Garbett is Public Affairs Coordinator for the Mali Development Group – www.malidg.org.uk.

To get in touch with Sam for further information he’d be happy to hear from you at sam.garbett@malidg.org.uk. Any comments and ideas for improving the Hub are especially welcome. We all look forward to hearing from you. Thanks for tuning in.

The Mali Interest Hub is an initiative run by the Mali Development Group, supported by the Alliance for Mali.